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"The first and the greatest of all obligations is to know your Lord, to know God, to know His Perfection."
-— Dr. ‘Umar Farūq ‘Abd-Allāh 

"The first and the greatest of all obligations is to know your Lord, to know God, to know His Perfection."

-— Dr. ‘Umar Farūq ‘Abd-Allāh 

As people across the globe head to circumambulate the Holy House, this Hajj serves as a poignant reminder to us all: that our lives should revolve round Him, and only Him.
People used to be present when they cooked food. They cooked with love, I had one teacher Umar Malahji; his wife would cook her food doing prayer on the Prophet (peace be upon him) the entire time, with Niyat-us-Shifa. That God would make that food a healing for the people that ate it and make the energy that they derive from it, used for worshipping Allah. They would only buy from grocers in Madīnah that they knew prayed five times in the Masjid. They would go out and pick their own animals and sacrifice them, because they did not want to buy meat from these butchers, because they didn’t know how they were treating the animals. This is a real family, and it is a fact, and I guarantee you, many people have experienced this. If you go and have eaten a full meal, and you go there, and they serve you food in the house of Umar Malahji you will not get indigestion by eating a second meal immediately after, and they will force you eat. That food was made with presence. People don’t have energy anymore. How is your food being grown? How is it being cooked? Because this is where energy comes from.

Generosity |

In many narrations the Prophet (ﷺ) is described as being the most generous. The word used in ḥadīth literature usually to describe his generosity is jūd, another word for generous is sakāʾ but this to my knowledge is never used to describe the Prophet (ﷺ). When you look them up they both are defined as ‘generous’ or ‘open handedness’ but an in-depth analysis reveals a marked difference. Jūd is to be generous when not asked, whereas sakāʾ means the person is generous but only when asked. 

He (ﷺ) was the most generous, with some saying he (ﷺ) was more generous than the rain. Interestingly in etymology the English word ‘generous’ stems from the French word ‘généreux’ and the Latin word ‘generosus’ both when translated mean “of noble birth.” Tying in so well with the Messenger of God (ﷺ) 

It is important to note that in the harsh deserts of Arabia, generosity was a virtuous act that was lost among many. (The concrete jungles we currently reside in can be just as harsh) The definition for ‘generous’ in English in my opinion is lacking, in that it does not do the act itself justice. When made without ostentation, without causing harm, without belittling others, without rebuke, without prompting and most importantly without expectation of reward - then generosity is from the heart making it not just more meaningful, but Prophetic. 

The picture is of a door leading to the Blue Mosque (Sulṭān Ahmet Camii) in Istanbul, Turkey, it was built in the 17th Century. One thing you notice about many of the mosques in Istanbul is that many of the entrances have these heavy iron chains. The purpose of these chains was to ensure those that entered did so in a state of humbleness. Legend has it that only the Sulṭān was allowed to enter the courtyard of the Blue Mosque on horseback. The iron chains made sure he would lower his head every time he entered. A deeply symbolic gesture rooted in Prophetic character; ensuring humility of the ruler in the face of the Divine.

The picture is of a door leading to the Blue Mosque (Sulṭān Ahmet Camii) in Istanbul, Turkey, it was built in the 17th Century. One thing you notice about many of the mosques in Istanbul is that many of the entrances have these heavy iron chains. The purpose of these chains was to ensure those that entered did so in a state of humbleness. 

Legend has it that only the Sulṭān was allowed to enter the courtyard of the Blue Mosque on horseback. The iron chains made sure he would lower his head every time he entered. A deeply symbolic gesture rooted in Prophetic character; ensuring humility of the ruler in the face of the Divine.

The word ‘sin’ which, outside of the religious circle, has fallen out of favor in the modern world, is possibly related to a Saxon word that meant ‘to wander.’ Sin is an English translation of the Hebrew term ‘het’ which like both its Arabic and Greek counterparts — khati’ah in Arabic and hamartia in the New Testament — is originally an archery term that meant ‘to miss the mark.’ Sin was also used in archaic English as an archery term for a miss. The idea being that sin, in a metaphysical sense, originates in a sound attempt at achieving a good but ‘misses the mark’ by mistaking an apparent good for a real one. Repentance is, in essence, redressing the miss and re-aligning one’s spiritual sights for the next attempt.
Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf
There are many who invest in dinars and dirhams. But those who invest in their spirit are few.
Ibn ‘Aṭā’illāh al-Sakandarī
The only one who’s going to judge us is Allah. Thank God. Thank God all these people on twitter are not my judge. Did you open his heart? Did you look into his heart? Did you determine what his niyyah was? There are two qualities, there are no better qualities than these two qualities: having a good opinion of Allah, and having a good opinion of the servants of Allah. We’re all trying, and we hope that Muslims just…we need to unite, at least be united in acknowledging that people come to different conclusions about situations. We’re all trying.
Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf 
If you are really sincere in your advice, you address it in privacy. If it’s private, it’s easier to achieve the truth. But when you are in a large group, the ego takes over. And then there’s the chance that it’s not sincere, it’s for achieving the upper hand.
Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf translating Imām al-Ghazālī’s Kitāb al-‘Ilm.
Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf closed yesterdays class with a quote by Ibn al-Qāsim al-Ḥākim, that’s mentioned in al-Tibr al-masbūk which was partially written by Imām al-Ghazālī. 
A translation of the Arabic reads, “Fitna (strife) arises from three kinds of people: newscasters, news seekers, and news listeners. None of them is free of blame.” 
So basically, the internet! Especially Facebook, and Twitter!
May Allāh protect us. Amīn.

Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf closed yesterdays class with a quote by Ibn al-Qāsim al-Ḥākim, that’s mentioned in al-Tibr al-masbūk which was partially written by Imām al-Ghazālī. 

A translation of the Arabic reads, “Fitna (strife) arises from three kinds of people: newscasters, news seekers, and news listeners. None of them is free of blame.” 

So basically, the internet! Especially Facebook, and Twitter!

May Allāh protect us. Amīn.

Call on your Lord when your heart is brittle, that is a time when it’s in pieces and the Light of Allah can fill the gaps. That is why Allāh is with the broken hearted.
Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf 
Ahmad Ibn Idris one of the great scholars of the 19th century, if he wanted an ayah of the Qurʾan he looked in his right palm, if he wanted a hadith he looked in his left palm, we have PalmPilot now, thats a different type of palm pilot.

Shaykh Ḥamza Yūsuf 

The Gulf Between the Here and the Hereafter |

The significance of joys and sufferings in this world will dwindle to nothing before the next not only quantitatively, because of its eternity, but qualitatively because of its nature. The Prophet (ṣall Allāhu ʿalay-hi wa-sallam) said:

The person who had the most pleasing life in this world, of any of the people of hell, will be summoned on Resurrection Day and utterly plunged into the hellfire, then asked, ‘O human being, have you ever beheld any good at all; have you ever felt a single joy?’ and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord.’ And the most miserable sufferer in this world, of any of the people of paradise, will be summoned and utterly plunged into paradise, then asked, ‘O human being, have you ever seen any bad at all; have you ever experienced a single misery?’ and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord: I have never seen any bad or suffered a single misery’ 

They are not lying, but what their testimony means is that nothing in this world can even be called “joy” or “misery” compared with the next.

Keller, Nūḥ Ḥā Mīm. (2008). Suffering and Divine Wisdom

The blessed month of Ramaḍān has come to an end. It has been one of the most difficult months I can remember, with so much turmoil around the globe, I’ve looked on in horror. These are reminders for us, to renew, review and revive our faith firstly within our homes, and then the wider community. May Allāh accept our fasts, our worship, our prayers, bless us in our homes, our actions, fill us with light, and allow us to be of service. May Allāh accept from us, and from you! AmīnʻĪd al-Fiṭr Mubārak! 

The blessed month of Ramaḍān has come to an end. 

It has been one of the most difficult months I can remember, with so much turmoil around the globe, I’ve looked on in horror. These are reminders for us, to renew, review and revive our faith firstly within our homes, and then the wider community. 

May Allāh accept our fasts, our worship, our prayers, bless us in our homes, our actions, fill us with light, and allow us to be of service. 

May Allāh accept from us, and from you! Amīn

ʻĪd al-Fiṭr Mubārak! 

O Allāh, I seek Your forgiveness for every sin that Your pen recorded and Your knowledge encompassed - every one that I have committed and that I am to commit until the end of my life. I seek Your forgiveness for all my sins: the first and the last, the intentional and unintentional, the few and the many, the minor and the major, the subtle and the noticeable, the past, the recent, the secret and the open and public - and all those I am to commit throughout my life.

O Allāh, I seek Your forgiveness for every sin of mine.

O Allāh, I seek Your forgiveness for every sin that pollutes what You have made pure, exposes what You have covered, or makes repulsive what You have beautified within me.

I seek forgiveness from You O Allāh, besides Whom there is nothing worthy of worship - the Living, the Self-Subsisting Sustainer of all the worlds. And I turn to You seeking forgiveness that increases with every blink of the eye and with every breath, that remains as long as You remain and lasts as long as You last; for Your Dominion will never - for all eternity come to an end, cease, or die.

O Allāh, accept this prayer, even though it is lacking.

I ask You to open every door of goodness, of blessings and mercy and guidance for everyone in that reads this, and for their parents, families, and all our brothers and sisters in our dīn. O Allāh, fulfill our needs, ease our affairs, expand our rizq and put blessings in it. Heal our sick and give strength to us Ya Rabb.

O Allāh, help the oppressed, grant them patience, grant them ease, grant strength and grant them a lasting victory.

O Allāh, make mine a prayer that meets Your acceptance and a request that meets Your blessing. Indeed You have power over all.

And shower blessings, peace and mercy on our master and chief - Muḥammad, the best of creation, and his family, with every glance and every breath, as many times as the number of all things encompassed within Your limitless knowledge.

Amīn! al-Fātiha.