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The Gulf Between the Here and the Hereafter |

The significance of joys and sufferings in this world will dwindle to nothing before the next not only quantitatively, because of its eternity, but qualitatively because of its nature. The Prophet (ṣall Allāhu ʿalay-hi wa-sallam) said:

The person who had the most pleasing life in this world, of any of the people of hell, will be summoned on Resurrection Day and utterly plunged into the hellfire, then asked, ‘O human being, have you ever beheld any good at all; have you ever felt a single joy?’ and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord.’ And the most miserable sufferer in this world, of any of the people of paradise, will be summoned and utterly plunged into paradise, then asked, ‘O human being, have you ever seen any bad at all; have you ever experienced a single misery?’ and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord: I have never seen any bad or suffered a single misery’ 

They are not lying, but what their testimony means is that nothing in this world can even be called “joy” or “misery” compared with the next.

Keller, Nūḥ Ḥā Mīm. (2008). Suffering and Divine Wisdom

The blessed month of Ramaḍān has come to an end. It has been one of the most difficult months I can remember, with so much turmoil around the globe, I’ve looked on in horror. These are reminders for us, to renew, review and revive our faith firstly within our homes, and then the wider community. May Allāh accept our fasts, our worship, our prayers, bless us in our homes, our actions, fill us with light, and allow us to be of service. May Allāh accept from us, and from you! AmīnʻĪd al-Fiṭr Mubārak! 

The blessed month of Ramaḍān has come to an end. 

It has been one of the most difficult months I can remember, with so much turmoil around the globe, I’ve looked on in horror. These are reminders for us, to renew, review and revive our faith firstly within our homes, and then the wider community. 

May Allāh accept our fasts, our worship, our prayers, bless us in our homes, our actions, fill us with light, and allow us to be of service. 

May Allāh accept from us, and from you! Amīn

ʻĪd al-Fiṭr Mubārak! 

O Allāh, I seek Your forgiveness for every sin that Your pen recorded and Your knowledge encompassed - every one that I have committed and that I am to commit until the end of my life. I seek Your forgiveness for all my sins: the first and the last, the intentional and unintentional, the few and the many, the minor and the major, the subtle and the noticeable, the past, the recent, the secret and the open and public - and all those I am to commit throughout my life.

O Allāh, I seek Your forgiveness for every sin of mine.

O Allāh, I seek Your forgiveness for every sin that pollutes what You have made pure, exposes what You have covered, or makes repulsive what You have beautified within me.

I seek forgiveness from You O Allāh, besides Whom there is nothing worthy of worship - the Living, the Self-Subsisting Sustainer of all the worlds. And I turn to You seeking forgiveness that increases with every blink of the eye and with every breath, that remains as long as You remain and lasts as long as You last; for Your Dominion will never - for all eternity come to an end, cease, or die.

O Allāh, accept this prayer, even though it is lacking.

I ask You to open every door of goodness, of blessings and mercy and guidance for everyone in that reads this, and for their parents, families, and all our brothers and sisters in our dīn. O Allāh, fulfill our needs, ease our affairs, expand our rizq and put blessings in it. Heal our sick and give strength to us Ya Rabb.

O Allāh, help the oppressed, grant them patience, grant them ease, grant strength and grant them a lasting victory.

O Allāh, make mine a prayer that meets Your acceptance and a request that meets Your blessing. Indeed You have power over all.

And shower blessings, peace and mercy on our master and chief - Muḥammad, the best of creation, and his family, with every glance and every breath, as many times as the number of all things encompassed within Your limitless knowledge.

Amīn! al-Fātiha.

#10Companions: Series
“Why should you not give for God’s cause when God alone will inherit what is in the heavens and earth? Those who gave and fought before the triumph are not like others: they are greater in rank than those who gave and fought afterwards. But God has promised a good reward to all of them: God is fully aware of all that you do.” -— Qurʾān [57:10]
Abū Bakr
ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb
ʿUthmān b. `Affān
ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib
Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh
Al-Zubayr b. Al-ʿAwwām
Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ
Saʿīd b. Zayd
ʿAbd al-Raḥmān b. ʿAwf
Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ 

May God be pleased with them and fill their graves with light.
All mistakes are mine, and Allāh alone knows best. Duʿāʾs requested.
“Verily, God and His angels bless the Prophet: [hence,] O you who have attained to faith, bless him and give yourselves up [to his guidance] in utter self-surrender!” -— Qurʾān [33:56]
اللهم صل وسلم وبارك على سيدنا ومولانا محمد خير البرية، وعلى اله في كل لمحة ونفس عدد ما وسعه علم الله
الفاتحة
Further Reading:
Hamid, Abdul Wahid. Companions of the Prophet Vols I and II.
as-Suyuti, Jalal ad-Din. The History of the Khalifas who took the right way.
Keller, Nuh Ha Mim. Reliance of the Traveller.
Alkhateeb, Firas. Lost Islamic History.

SeekersGuidance. Following the Footsteps of the Noble Companions. (Online course starts Sept 2014)

#10Companions: Series

“Why should you not give for God’s cause when God alone will inherit what is in the heavens and earth? Those who gave and fought before the triumph are not like others: they are greater in rank than those who gave and fought afterwards. But God has promised a good reward to all of them: God is fully aware of all that you do.” -— Qurʾān [57:10]

May God be pleased with them and fill their graves with light.

All mistakes are mine, and Allāh alone knows best. Duʿāʾs requested.

“Verily, God and His angels bless the Prophet: [hence,] O you who have attained to faith, bless him and give yourselves up [to his guidance] in utter self-surrender!” -— Qurʾān [33:56]

اللهم صل وسلم وبارك على سيدنا ومولانا محمد خير البرية، وعلى اله في كل لمحة ونفس عدد ما وسعه علم الله

الفاتحة

Further Reading:

Hamid, Abdul Wahid. Companions of the Prophet Vols I and II.

as-Suyuti, Jalal ad-Din. The History of the Khalifas who took the right way.

Keller, Nuh Ha Mim. Reliance of the Traveller.

Alkhateeb, Firas. Lost Islamic History.

SeekersGuidance. Following the Footsteps of the Noble Companions. (Online course starts Sept 2014)

#10Companions:  Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ
Abū ʿUbaydah was one of the first to accept Islam, memorize the Qurʾān, and also participate in the emigrations to Ethiopia and to Madīnah. The Prophet (ﷺ) designated him ‘amīn al-ummah’ (Trustee of the Muslim Community) because of his honesty. He is the last of the ten Companions promised paradise.
Abū ʿUbaydah possessed supreme skill, he was one of the best archers in the ranks, and could scout out the opposition and help develop strategies to overcome the enemy. In his childhood it was his father that trained him, he taught him how to shoot an arrow from various positions such as from a stationary position, a moving position etc. When he accepted Islam, his father was furious, and wanted to kill him.
He took part in many battles and fought heroically in the Battle of Badr, having to face his own father, this was very difficult for him, it’s reported that his father chased him around seeking confrontation; eventually he relented and killed his own father. Now imagine that for a moment, having to kill your own father, but he did, a verse of the Qurʾān relating to this specific incident was revealed [See 58:22]. He was among those that guarded the Prophet (ﷺ) at during the turmoil at Uḥud. One that day, the Prophet (ﷺ) suffered severe facial injuries resulting in shards being lodged into his noble face, Abū ʿUbaydah decided that using his teeth would the best way to extract the wedged pieces, as it would cause the Prophet (ﷺ) the least amount of pain, in doing so Abū ʿUbaydah himself lost two teeth this resulted in a defect in his speech. 
Abū ʿUbaydah always placed Islam before himself, irrespective of the scenario, once he led a secondary unit into battle, he relinquished the reins to Amrū ibn al-‘Āṣ, the leader of the first battalion to avoid wrangling over leadership. Abū ʿUbaydah was held in high esteem by the other companions, it’s reported that ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb asked some of the companions, “What do you wish for?” some replied they wished for a room full of gold to spend in the way of God, others said similar things stating they would spend it in charity. ʿUmar then said, “I wish that this house was full of men like Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ.”
He played an active role in the Caliphate of Abū Bakr and an even greater one under ʿUmar, who appointed him Supreme Commander of the army replacing the great Khālid ibn al-Walīd. There was great wisdom in his decision, Abū ʿUbaydah was a great thinker and negotiator, and he made deals and reassured many Christian’s that they would be safe under Muslim rule in Syria. Many people would become Muslim, and no blood would be shed. His diplomacy skills were more superior to those of the great Khālid ibn al-Walīd.  Some historians to have said that he founded the first hospitals in the Middle East; he even built a dam in Syria to prevent flooding.
He served as a governor under ʿUmar, who was shocked to find as governor his house had so few possessions, reportedly just a rug to sleep on and a jug, the world had not consumed him from his religion, he remained steadfast, fair and deeply spiritual. He said that these possessions were more than enough, ʿUmar cried and said “That the world had changed them all, accept for Abū ʿUbaydah. Syria was struck by an epidemic, and as governor he had the chance to leave or isolate himself from those infected, but he remained faithful to them and suffered with the troops, this would eventually lead to his demise, he would die during the caliphate of ʿUmar. His tomb lies in present day Jordan.

May God be pleased with him and fill his grave with light.
Further Sources:
Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ
Abū ʿUbaydah interaction with ʿUmar

#10Companions:  Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ

Abū ʿUbaydah was one of the first to accept Islam, memorize the Qurʾān, and also participate in the emigrations to Ethiopia and to Madīnah. The Prophet () designated him ‘amīn al-ummah’ (Trustee of the Muslim Community) because of his honesty. He is the last of the ten Companions promised paradise.

Abū ʿUbaydah possessed supreme skill, he was one of the best archers in the ranks, and could scout out the opposition and help develop strategies to overcome the enemy. In his childhood it was his father that trained him, he taught him how to shoot an arrow from various positions such as from a stationary position, a moving position etc. When he accepted Islam, his father was furious, and wanted to kill him.

He took part in many battles and fought heroically in the Battle of Badr, having to face his own father, this was very difficult for him, it’s reported that his father chased him around seeking confrontation; eventually he relented and killed his own father. Now imagine that for a moment, having to kill your own father, but he did, a verse of the Qurʾān relating to this specific incident was revealed [See 58:22]. He was among those that guarded the Prophet () at during the turmoil at Uḥud. One that day, the Prophet () suffered severe facial injuries resulting in shards being lodged into his noble face, Abū ʿUbaydah decided that using his teeth would the best way to extract the wedged pieces, as it would cause the Prophet () the least amount of pain, in doing so Abū ʿUbaydah himself lost two teeth this resulted in a defect in his speech. 

Abū ʿUbaydah always placed Islam before himself, irrespective of the scenario, once he led a secondary unit into battle, he relinquished the reins to Amrū ibn al-‘Āṣ, the leader of the first battalion to avoid wrangling over leadership. Abū ʿUbaydah was held in high esteem by the other companions, it’s reported that ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb asked some of the companions, “What do you wish for?” some replied they wished for a room full of gold to spend in the way of God, others said similar things stating they would spend it in charity. ʿUmar then said, “I wish that this house was full of men like Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ.”

He played an active role in the Caliphate of Abū Bakr and an even greater one under ʿUmar, who appointed him Supreme Commander of the army replacing the great Khālid ibn al-Walīd. There was great wisdom in his decision, Abū ʿUbaydah was a great thinker and negotiator, and he made deals and reassured many Christian’s that they would be safe under Muslim rule in Syria. Many people would become Muslim, and no blood would be shed. His diplomacy skills were more superior to those of the great Khālid ibn al-Walīd.  Some historians to have said that he founded the first hospitals in the Middle East; he even built a dam in Syria to prevent flooding.

He served as a governor under ʿUmar, who was shocked to find as governor his house had so few possessions, reportedly just a rug to sleep on and a jug, the world had not consumed him from his religion, he remained steadfast, fair and deeply spiritual. He said that these possessions were more than enough, ʿUmar cried and said “That the world had changed them all, accept for Abū ʿUbaydah. Syria was struck by an epidemic, and as governor he had the chance to leave or isolate himself from those infected, but he remained faithful to them and suffered with the troops, this would eventually lead to his demise, he would die during the caliphate of ʿUmar. His tomb lies in present day Jordan.

May God be pleased with him and fill his grave with light.

Further Sources:

Abū ʿUbaydah b. al-Jarrāḥ

Abū ʿUbaydah interaction with ʿUmar

#10Companions:  ʿAbd al-Raḥmān b. ʿAwf (d. 31/654)
ʿAbd al-Raḥmān’s original name was ʿAbdul ʿAmr (servant of ʿAmr) but the Prophet (ﷺ) renamed him ʿAbd al-Raḥmān (servant of the Most Merciful) after he converted. He converted when he was around 21 years old, and although he did not have a direct link to the Prophet (ﷺ) he did share a bond of sort, his mother helped deliver the Prophet (ﷺ). He was the ninth of the ten companions that was promised paradise. 
He emigrated twice, once to Ethiopia to escape persecution at the hands of the pagan Meccans, and later on his life to Madīnah. He is remembered by many to have been immensely rich, but he knew both poverty and wealth. When he left Mecca to go to Ethiopia he left behind everything, and later in his life when he emigrated to Madīnah he arrived penniless. When the companions emigrated the Prophet (ﷺ) paired them with an Anṣārī brother, ʿAbd al-Raḥmān was paired with one of the richest men, he offered him half of all of his wealth, ʿAbd al-Raḥmān thanked him, prayed for him and asked to be directed to the marketplace instead. He was an astute businessman, and in a matter of days would become wealthy once again, it was said that ʿAbd al-Raḥmān could turn over a stone and find gold beneath it. He got married soon after giving a brick of gold for mahr. 
ʿAbd al-Raḥmān philanthropy did not bring about delusional overindulgence or arrogance. He still participated in all of the battles, and was one of the few that remained steadfast with the Prophet (ﷺ) at Uḥud, a battle in which he was wounded so badly that he would limp for the rest of his life. He had the most ḥalāl income stating that, “We left behind around half of ḥalāl income because we were afraid of ribā (usury).” He would give freely; pay of people’s debts, equip the army, whenever any of the Caliphs needed money he would be at the front giving. Ṭalḥah states that the people of Madīnah were living off ʿAbd al-Raḥmān, that’s how much money he gave. After the sad demise of the Prophet (ﷺ) he took it upon himself to fund the widows of the Prophet (ﷺ) such as Lady ‘Ā’ishah.
He also has the distinct honor of being the first companion to lead the Prophet (ﷺ) in prayer. ʿAbd al-Raḥmān was unaware as the Prophet (ﷺ) joined the prayer midway, the fiqh of missing a unit in prayer stems from this incident.  
He left behind millions, and his funeral was one the largest seen. He was buried in Baqīʿ cemetery in Madīnah. 
May God be pleased with him and fill his grave with light.
Further Sources:



ʿAbd al-Raḥmān b. ʿAwf
The Honest Merchant

#10Companions:  ʿAbd al-Raḥmān b. ʿAwf (d. 31/654)

ʿAbd al-Raḥmān’s original name was ʿAbdul ʿAmr (servant of ʿAmr) but the Prophet () renamed him ʿAbd al-Raḥmān (servant of the Most Merciful) after he converted. He converted when he was around 21 years old, and although he did not have a direct link to the Prophet () he did share a bond of sort, his mother helped deliver the Prophet (). He was the ninth of the ten companions that was promised paradise. 

He emigrated twice, once to Ethiopia to escape persecution at the hands of the pagan Meccans, and later on his life to Madīnah. He is remembered by many to have been immensely rich, but he knew both poverty and wealth. When he left Mecca to go to Ethiopia he left behind everything, and later in his life when he emigrated to Madīnah he arrived penniless. When the companions emigrated the Prophet () paired them with an Anṣārī brother, ʿAbd al-Raḥmān was paired with one of the richest men, he offered him half of all of his wealth, ʿAbd al-Raḥmān thanked him, prayed for him and asked to be directed to the marketplace instead. He was an astute businessman, and in a matter of days would become wealthy once again, it was said that ʿAbd al-Raḥmān could turn over a stone and find gold beneath it. He got married soon after giving a brick of gold for mahr. 

ʿAbd al-Raḥmān philanthropy did not bring about delusional overindulgence or arrogance. He still participated in all of the battles, and was one of the few that remained steadfast with the Prophet () at Uḥud, a battle in which he was wounded so badly that he would limp for the rest of his life. He had the most ḥalāl income stating that, “We left behind around half of ḥalāl income because we were afraid of ribā (usury).” He would give freely; pay of people’s debts, equip the army, whenever any of the Caliphs needed money he would be at the front giving. Ṭalḥah states that the people of Madīnah were living off ʿAbd al-Raḥmān, that’s how much money he gave. After the sad demise of the Prophet () he took it upon himself to fund the widows of the Prophet () such as Lady ‘Ā’ishah.

He also has the distinct honor of being the first companion to lead the Prophet () in prayer. ʿAbd al-Raḥmān was unaware as the Prophet () joined the prayer midway, the fiqh of missing a unit in prayer stems from this incident.  

He left behind millions, and his funeral was one the largest seen. He was buried in Baqīʿ cemetery in Madīnah.

May God be pleased with him and fill his grave with light.

Further Sources:

ʿAbd al-Raḥmān b. ʿAwf

The Honest Merchant

#10Companions: Saʿīd b. Zayd (d. 50/670)
Saʿīd was a very special early companion of the Prophet (ﷺ), he accepted Islam in the Meccan period before he had reached the age of twenty. He is the eighth of the #10Companions to be promised paradise.  
His father Zayd b. ʿAmr b. Mufayl rejected idolatry of the pagan Arabs and travelled to seek the knowledge of the true Abrahamic faiths that the Arabs had lost. He would rescue infant girls marked for death by burial, a common practice before the advent of the Prophet (ﷺ). So in this regard Saʿīd was very blessed, he was raised in a house that rejected polytheism and idolatry.
Saʿīd married Fāṭimah, the sister of ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb, and they both accepted Islam. They concealed their new chosen faith from the pagans, especially ʿUmar. It was in the house of Saʿīd and Fāṭimah that ʿUmar who had set out to kill the Prophet (ﷺ) experienced a transformation upon reading a passage of the Qurʾān.  
Saʿīd took part in all of the Prophet’s (ﷺ) battle except for Badr, as he was on a renaissance mission with Ṭalḥah. It is said that he would always be the first to charge into battle, which is remarkable because the Muslims were almost always outnumbered. He said, “To witness a battle along side the Prophet (ﷺ) more beloved to living a lifetime of good deeds.” Even after the passing of the Prophet (ﷺ), Saʿīd continued to serve Islam, fighting against the Persians, and participating in the siege and eventual surrender of Damascus, later serving as governor. 

He died at the age of seventy in his sleep peacefully. Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ and ʻAbdullāh ibn ʿUmar carried out the rituals and state that when they attempted to perfume the body it was already fragrant with the sweetest of musks. Saʿīd was buried in ʿAqīq, a small town outside of Madīnah, in the Baqīʿ cemetery.
May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.
Further Sources:
Saʿīd b. Zayd
Saʿīd b. Zayd - Muftī Ismāʿil Menk

#10Companions: Saʿīd b. Zayd (d. 50/670)

Saʿīd was a very special early companion of the Prophet (), he accepted Islam in the Meccan period before he had reached the age of twenty. He is the eighth of the #10Companions to be promised paradise.  

His father Zayd b. ʿAmr b. Mufayl rejected idolatry of the pagan Arabs and travelled to seek the knowledge of the true Abrahamic faiths that the Arabs had lost. He would rescue infant girls marked for death by burial, a common practice before the advent of the Prophet (). So in this regard Saʿīd was very blessed, he was raised in a house that rejected polytheism and idolatry.

Saʿīd married Fāṭimah, the sister of ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb, and they both accepted Islam. They concealed their new chosen faith from the pagans, especially ʿUmar. It was in the house of Saʿīd and Fāṭimah that ʿUmar who had set out to kill the Prophet () experienced a transformation upon reading a passage of the Qurʾān.  

Saʿīd took part in all of the Prophet’s () battle except for Badr, as he was on a renaissance mission with Ṭalḥah. It is said that he would always be the first to charge into battle, which is remarkable because the Muslims were almost always outnumbered. He said, “To witness a battle along side the Prophet () more beloved to living a lifetime of good deeds.” Even after the passing of the Prophet (), Saʿīd continued to serve Islam, fighting against the Persians, and participating in the siege and eventual surrender of Damascus, later serving as governor. 

He died at the age of seventy in his sleep peacefully. Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ and ʻAbdullāh ibn ʿUmar carried out the rituals and state that when they attempted to perfume the body it was already fragrant with the sweetest of musks. Saʿīd was buried in ʿAqīq, a small town outside of Madīnah, in the Baqīʿ cemetery.

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.

Further Sources:

Saʿīd b. Zayd

Saʿīd b. Zayd - Muftī Ismāʿil Menk

#10Companions: Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ (d. 55/675)
Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ was one of the first to accept Islam, having converted when he was seventeen. He was the cousin of ʿĀminah bint Wahb, the mother of the Prophet (ﷺ), thus making him an Uncle of the Prophet  (ﷺ). He was the seventh companion to be promised paradise; famously he was guaranteed paradise on more than one occasion. 
The Prophet (ﷺ) was hugely proud of his Uncle, and he (ﷺ) prayed that all the supplications of his Uncle would be accepted. It is for this reason that many of the other companions were afraid of him. There’s a story that when Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ was the governor in Iraq, a man slandered ʿAlī in his presence, he rebuked him and told him not to, the man did not listen, and continued. It is then said that a beast entered Iraq and killed that man; many say it is because of Saʿd’s prayer against him. 
Like many of the companions he was often on the front line and took part in the major battles of the Prophet (ﷺ), he was the first to cast an arrow at the Battle of Badr and the Prophet (ﷺ) made duʿāʾ for him, “O Lord, direct his shooting and respond to his prayer.” He was blessed with wealth and was considerably generous, often giving to charity. He left two-thirds of his wealth for his daughter and third for charity, after asking the Prophet (ﷺ) what to do.
He played a key part in the caliphates of ʿUmar and ʿUthmān, leading armies that facilitated the entrance of Iraq and the cities of Persia into the Muslim domain. He would serve as governor in Kūfa under both. He went to China in 650 when ʿUthmān was Caliph, there he met the Emperor and built a mosque in Guangzhou that still stands to this day. Currently China has some 20 million Muslims. He was not embroiled in the civil strife that followed the assassination of ʿUthmān. 
It’s said he lost his sight later on in his life and died near Madīnah. He outlived all of the 10 companions promised paradise. He was buried in the same shrouds that he wore on the day of Badr, as he had requested. 

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.
Further Sources: 
Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ 
Islam in China

#10Companions: Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ (d. 55/675)

Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ was one of the first to accept Islam, having converted when he was seventeen. He was the cousin of ʿĀminah bint Wahb, the mother of the Prophet (), thus making him an Uncle of the Prophet  (). He was the seventh companion to be promised paradise; famously he was guaranteed paradise on more than one occasion. 

The Prophet () was hugely proud of his Uncle, and he () prayed that all the supplications of his Uncle would be accepted. It is for this reason that many of the other companions were afraid of him. There’s a story that when Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ was the governor in Iraq, a man slandered ʿAlī in his presence, he rebuked him and told him not to, the man did not listen, and continued. It is then said that a beast entered Iraq and killed that man; many say it is because of Saʿd’s prayer against him. 

Like many of the companions he was often on the front line and took part in the major battles of the Prophet (), he was the first to cast an arrow at the Battle of Badr and the Prophet () made duʿāʾ for him, “O Lord, direct his shooting and respond to his prayer.” He was blessed with wealth and was considerably generous, often giving to charity. He left two-thirds of his wealth for his daughter and third for charity, after asking the Prophet () what to do.

He played a key part in the caliphates of ʿUmar and ʿUthmān, leading armies that facilitated the entrance of Iraq and the cities of Persia into the Muslim domain. He would serve as governor in Kūfa under both. He went to China in 650 when ʿUthmān was Caliph, there he met the Emperor and built a mosque in Guangzhou that still stands to this day. Currently China has some 20 million Muslims. He was not embroiled in the civil strife that followed the assassination of ʿUthmān. 

It’s said he lost his sight later on in his life and died near Madīnah. He outlived all of the 10 companions promised paradise. He was buried in the same shrouds that he wore on the day of Badr, as he had requested. 

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.

Further Sources: 

Saʿd b. Abī Waqqāṣ 

Islam in China

#10Companions: Al-Zubayr b. Al-ʿAwwām (d. 36/656)
Al-Zubayr was a cousin of the Prophet (ﷺ) his mother was the sister of Ḥamzah, the Chief of Martyrs. He was one of the first and youngest companions to accept Islam; he was reportedly 8 when he converted. Al-Zubayr was the sixth person to be promised paradise, in his life he immigrated twice, first to Ethiopia and secondly to Madīnah. 
It is reported that Al-Zubayr was the first to draw a sword for Islam. He was in Mecca, and heard that the Prophet (ﷺ) had been killed; he rushed out of his house with nothing but his sword drawn. To his surprise, he saw the Prophet (ﷺ) who inquired what he was doing, Al-Zubayr explained and then the Prophet (ﷺ) supplicated on his behalf.  
When he accepted Islam, his father attempted to coerce him into rejecting the faith, but he remained committed stating, “I shall never return to disbelief.” He took part in many battles including Badr and Uḥud, and fought valiantly, it is said that his chest was peppered with scars. The thing we often overlook is that the companions were completely devoted to the Prophet (ﷺ), Al-Zubayr was no different, and was often seen fighting alongside ʿAlī. ʿAlī said that in war Al-Zubayr would attack like a lion. 
Al-Zubayr was bequeathed with considerable wealth; it was all spent willingly in the service of Islam or charity. This continued long after the Prophet (ﷺ) death. He was entrusted by ʿUmar to part of the committee that decides who the third Caliph should be; ʿUmar himself believed that Al-Zubayr had all the qualities to be Caliph himself. 
Al-Zubayr did not fight at the Battle of Camel, as he refused to take sides, but just as he turned to leave a man named Ibn Jarmūz killed him near Baṣra, allegedly when he was busy in prayer. It is reported that in his will he left behind a house for each of his divorced daughters, the rest being divided amongst his widows and children.
May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light. 
Further Sources:
Al-Zubayr b. Al-ʿAwwām

#10Companions: Al-Zubayr b. Al-ʿAwwām (d. 36/656)

Al-Zubayr was a cousin of the Prophet () his mother was the sister of Ḥamzah, the Chief of Martyrs. He was one of the first and youngest companions to accept Islam; he was reportedly 8 when he converted. Al-Zubayr was the sixth person to be promised paradise, in his life he immigrated twice, first to Ethiopia and secondly to Madīnah. 

It is reported that Al-Zubayr was the first to draw a sword for Islam. He was in Mecca, and heard that the Prophet () had been killed; he rushed out of his house with nothing but his sword drawn. To his surprise, he saw the Prophet () who inquired what he was doing, Al-Zubayr explained and then the Prophet () supplicated on his behalf.  

When he accepted Islam, his father attempted to coerce him into rejecting the faith, but he remained committed stating, “I shall never return to disbelief.” He took part in many battles including Badr and Uḥud, and fought valiantly, it is said that his chest was peppered with scars. The thing we often overlook is that the companions were completely devoted to the Prophet (), Al-Zubayr was no different, and was often seen fighting alongside ʿAlī. ʿAlī said that in war Al-Zubayr would attack like a lion. 

Al-Zubayr was bequeathed with considerable wealth; it was all spent willingly in the service of Islam or charity. This continued long after the Prophet () death. He was entrusted by ʿUmar to part of the committee that decides who the third Caliph should be; ʿUmar himself believed that Al-Zubayr had all the qualities to be Caliph himself. 

Al-Zubayr did not fight at the Battle of Camel, as he refused to take sides, but just as he turned to leave a man named Ibn Jarmūz killed him near Baṣra, allegedly when he was busy in prayer. It is reported that in his will he left behind a house for each of his divorced daughters, the rest being divided amongst his widows and children.

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light. 

Further Sources:

Al-Zubayr b. Al-ʿAwwām

#10Companions: Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh (d. 36/656)
Ṭalḥah came to Islam through his friend Abū Bakr, they were from the same tribe. He was a tradesman and much of the trade back then was done in Syria, the Prophet (ﷺ) had visited Syria before and Ṭalḥah was told by a monk that Prophet (ﷺ) was indeed a Messenger. The price for accepting Islam in the early years almost always resulted in torture, it is reported that Ṭalḥah would be tortured along with Abū Bakr, in fact they were once found tied together. He was the first of eight men who accepted Islam, and is the fifth companion promised Paradise.
He was committed follower of the Prophet (ﷺ), and is best known for his roles at Uḥud, his unyielding support for the Prophet (ﷺ) when the army was in disarray is a testament to his devotion. He swore to stay by the side of the Prophet (ﷺ) even if it resulted in death, it said he suffered some seventy-five wounds whilst defending the Prophet (ﷺ) and that the blood loss was so severe that he even lost consciousness. He sacrificed himself so nobly that day that the Prophet (ﷺ) would say, “Whoever wants to see a martyr walking on two feet, look at Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh.” He however missed the Battle of Badr as he had been sent along with Saʿīd b. Zayd on a reconnaissance mission elsewhere, so were unaware that a battle had taken place.
Ṭalḥah was incredibly generous; he often paid of other people debts. He had many names given to him by the Prophet (ﷺ), they all had similar meanings, one of them was Jūd meaning generous, but this is a generosity that’s unmatched, someone that gives without having to be asked, its someone that gives sincerely without expecting anything back.
He died during the Battle of Camel, and was buried in Baṣra, although he was not there to fight. A stray arrow is reported to have penetrated his chest, upon which he said, “In the Name of God, and God’s decree must come to pass.”

May God be pleased with him and fill his grave with light.
Further Sources: 
Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh - Shaykh Omar Suleiman
Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh, Fountain Magazine

#10Companions: Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh (d. 36/656)

Ṭalḥah came to Islam through his friend Abū Bakr, they were from the same tribe. He was a tradesman and much of the trade back then was done in Syria, the Prophet () had visited Syria before and Ṭalḥah was told by a monk that Prophet () was indeed a Messenger. The price for accepting Islam in the early years almost always resulted in torture, it is reported that Ṭalḥah would be tortured along with Abū Bakr, in fact they were once found tied together. He was the first of eight men who accepted Islam, and is the fifth companion promised Paradise.

He was committed follower of the Prophet (), and is best known for his roles at Uḥud, his unyielding support for the Prophet () when the army was in disarray is a testament to his devotion. He swore to stay by the side of the Prophet () even if it resulted in death, it said he suffered some seventy-five wounds whilst defending the Prophet () and that the blood loss was so severe that he even lost consciousness. He sacrificed himself so nobly that day that the Prophet () would say, “Whoever wants to see a martyr walking on two feet, look at Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh.” He however missed the Battle of Badr as he had been sent along with Saʿīd b. Zayd on a reconnaissance mission elsewhere, so were unaware that a battle had taken place.

Ṭalḥah was incredibly generous; he often paid of other people debts. He had many names given to him by the Prophet (), they all had similar meanings, one of them was Jūd meaning generous, but this is a generosity that’s unmatched, someone that gives without having to be asked, its someone that gives sincerely without expecting anything back.

He died during the Battle of Camel, and was buried in Bara, although he was not there to fight. A stray arrow is reported to have penetrated his chest, upon which he said, “In the Name of God, and God’s decree must come to pass.”

May God be pleased with him and fill his grave with light.

Further Sources: 

Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh - Shaykh Omar Suleiman

Ṭalḥah b. ʿUbayd Allāh, Fountain Magazine

#10Companions: ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib (d. 40/661) 
ʿAlī was perhaps the closest of all the companions to the Prophet (ﷺ). Firstly he was the Prophet’s (ﷺ) cousin who lived with him and was raised by him; later on in life would become his son-in-law. He was the first male child to have accepted Islam. He is fourth of the #10Companions promised paradise, and the last of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn.
ʿAlī was a renowned swordsman and a fierce fighter on the battlefield; he was the Prophet’s (ﷺ) standard-bearer in battle, including the Battle of Badr, the first battle to take place after Hijrah. It was ʿAlī who famously tore off the door at Khaybar and used it as a shield; it was at the conclusion of this battle that the Prophet (ﷺ) reportedly gave ʿAlī the title of Asadullāh (Lion of God). He was a ḥāfiẓ of the Qurʾān, an articulate speaker, a real ocean of knowledge.   
He had the special blessing of marrying Fāṭimah al-Zahrā, one of the four women of complete faith (Āsiyah, Maryam and Khadījah being the others) and from their union came al-Ḥasan and al-Ḥusayn; the descendants of the Prophet (ﷺ) all stem from ʿAlī’s offspring. ʿAlī lived a very austere lifestyle; even refusing an income from the treasury when he became Caliph. He preferred only the crudest of food and clothing. 
The Prophet (ﷺ) loved him deeply, and said, “I am the city of knowledge, and ʿAlī is its gate.”
His Caliphate was a very troubled one, he was first hesitant to take it, but was persuaded to do so by elders. The civil strife and discord borne from the death of ʿUthmān caused consternation amongst the Muslims, many wanted his death avenged. But ʿAlī was a pragmatist, knowing that it was important to unify the Muslims not disintegrate them further. He moved the capital from Madīnah to Kufa as he had greater support in the region, but many were disheartened by this move. The seeds of disunity had been sown; you had two camps those that wanted justice for the murder of ʿUthmān, and those with ʿAlī who did not want bloodshed some 20 years after the Prophet (ﷺ) passing. Both were right in their own positions, discord was apparent.
He was a judicious leader, and passionately honorable, Imām al-Suyūtī narrates that during his Caliphate ʿAlī took a Jewish man to court for stealing his coat of armor. The judge ruled in favor of the Jewish man, as ʿAlī was unable to provide ample witnesses to prove his claim. The Jewish man was humbled and claimed “The commander of the faithful brought me before his judge, and the judge ruled against him. I witness that this is the truth, and I witness that there is not deity but God, I witness that Muḥammad is the Messenger of God, and that this armor is your armor.” 
Some forty years after the Hijrah of the Prophet (ﷺ), in Ramaḍān, whilst ʿAlī was praying in a mosque in Kufa, he was assassinated, bringing to end a turbulent reign with bloodshed, something ʿAlī had tried to prevent. With that the reigns of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn had ended, the lights that had surrounded the Prophet (ﷺ), his closest companions had all gone, the unity amongst the Muslim community that they had fought so hard to harness together had unraveled completely. Islam now entered a new phase.
May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.
Further sources:
ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib - Dr T J Winter
Ṣallābī, (2010). ʻAli ibn Abi Tâlib. 1st ed. Vol 1 and 2. Riyadh: International Islamic Publishing House 
ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib - Muftī Ismāʿil Menk  

#10Companions: ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib (d. 40/661) 

ʿAlī was perhaps the closest of all the companions to the Prophet (). Firstly he was the Prophet’s () cousin who lived with him and was raised by him; later on in life would become his son-in-law. He was the first male child to have accepted Islam. He is fourth of the #10Companions promised paradise, and the last of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn.

ʿAlī was a renowned swordsman and a fierce fighter on the battlefield; he was the Prophet’s () standard-bearer in battle, including the Battle of Badr, the first battle to take place after Hijrah. It was ʿAlī who famously tore off the door at Khaybar and used it as a shield; it was at the conclusion of this battle that the Prophet () reportedly gave ʿAlī the title of Asadullāh (Lion of God). He was a ḥāfiẓ of the Qurʾān, an articulate speaker, a real ocean of knowledge.   

He had the special blessing of marrying Fāṭimah al-Zahrā, one of the four women of complete faith (Āsiyah, Maryam and Khadījah being the others) and from their union came al-Ḥasan and al-Ḥusayn; the descendants of the Prophet () all stem from ʿAlī’s offspring. ʿAlī lived a very austere lifestyle; even refusing an income from the treasury when he became Caliph. He preferred only the crudest of food and clothing. 

The Prophet () loved him deeply, and said, “I am the city of knowledge, and ʿAlī is its gate.”

His Caliphate was a very troubled one, he was first hesitant to take it, but was persuaded to do so by elders. The civil strife and discord borne from the death of ʿUthmān caused consternation amongst the Muslims, many wanted his death avenged. But ʿAlī was a pragmatist, knowing that it was important to unify the Muslims not disintegrate them further. He moved the capital from Madīnah to Kufa as he had greater support in the region, but many were disheartened by this move. The seeds of disunity had been sown; you had two camps those that wanted justice for the murder of ʿUthmān, and those with ʿAlī who did not want bloodshed some 20 years after the Prophet () passing. Both were right in their own positions, discord was apparent.

He was a judicious leader, and passionately honorable, Imām al-Suyūtī narrates that during his Caliphate ʿAlī took a Jewish man to court for stealing his coat of armor. The judge ruled in favor of the Jewish man, as ʿAlī was unable to provide ample witnesses to prove his claim. The Jewish man was humbled and claimed “The commander of the faithful brought me before his judge, and the judge ruled against him. I witness that this is the truth, and I witness that there is not deity but God, I witness that Muḥammad is the Messenger of God, and that this armor is your armor.” 

Some forty years after the Hijrah of the Prophet (), in Ramaḍān, whilst ʿAlī was praying in a mosque in Kufa, he was assassinated, bringing to end a turbulent reign with bloodshed, something ʿAlī had tried to prevent. With that the reigns of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn had ended, the lights that had surrounded the Prophet (), his closest companions had all gone, the unity amongst the Muslim community that they had fought so hard to harness together had unraveled completely. Islam now entered a new phase.

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.

Further sources:

ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib - Dr T J Winter

Ṣallābī, (2010). ʻAli ibn Abi Tâlib. 1st ed. Vol 1 and 2. Riyadh: International Islamic Publishing House 

ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib - Muftī Ismāʿil Menk  

#10Companions: ʿUthmān b. `Affān (d. 35/655)  
The third of the #10Companions promised paradise, and the third of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn. He was a scribe of the Qurʾān and with it a ḥāfiẓ, he initiated the third stage of establishing the written text of the Qurʾān.  He was called dhū al-nūrayn (possessor of two lights) as he married two daughters of the Prophet (ﷺ) Ruqayyah and after her death Umm Kulthūm. 
ʿUthmān was among those who migrated twice for the sake of God, once to Abyssinia to escape persecution by the Meccans, and secondly to Madīnah. He was one of the most generous men. He once equipped an army heading out to Tabūk with 950 camels, 50 horses and then placed a thousand gold dinars  (roughly around $180,000) in the Prophet’s (ﷺ) lap. He freed countless slaves, saying that “No Friday has passed in which I did not free a slave since I accepted Islam, unless prevented in doing so by debt, then I would free him after that.” 
ʿUthmān was exceedingly handsome, as a result he would receive proposals before and after his conversion. Nevertheless, he was the most modest man, even the Prophet (ﷺ) attested to ʿUthmān’s modesty, famously citing that the angels’ felt meek before him. 
His Caliphate saw Islam spread further; Eastern Europe and much of North Africa were now under Muslim control. The first Muslim naval fleet was built under his tutelage, and diplomatic relations were being built as far as China with the Tang Dynasty. Although it is fair to say that his reign was not as popular as his predecessors, but this was due to the expansion being slow, resulting in economic stagnation. Nevertheless, he was still highly respected and thoughts of any kind of mutiny were far fetched.
His most famous achievement is the compilation of the Qurʾān. The Qurʾān was revealed in different dialects, in total seven, these are known as qira’as. As more non-Arabs became Muslim a problem arose over pronunciation of words, this led to confusion among new non-Arab Muslims. So ʿUthmān commissioned a group of companions to organise the Qurʾān according to the dialect of the Prophet’s (ﷺ) tribe, known as Qur’aysh. This would then be spread across the lands. 
He was also martyred, it’s reported that one night ʿUthmān saw a dream in which the Prophet (ﷺ) said, “Break your fast with us tomorrow.” ʿUthmān fasted the following day and was murdered by assailants who broke into his house before sunrise, at the time he was reading the Qurʾān; it was the last day of Dhū al-Ḥijjah. His death marked a turning point, Islam would never be the same again. He is buried in Baqī’ in Madīnah which lies adjacent to Masjid al-Nabawī.
May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.
Further Sources:
ʿUthmān b. `Affān - Dr T J Winter
ʿUthmān b. `Affān. (2014). In Encyclopaedia Britannica
Qurʾān Weekly: ʿUthmān b. `Affān

#10Companions: ʿUthmān b. `Affān (d. 35/655)  

The third of the #10Companions promised paradise, and the third of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn. He was a scribe of the Qurʾān and with it a ḥāfiẓ, he initiated the third stage of establishing the written text of the Qurʾān.  He was called dhū al-nūrayn (possessor of two lights) as he married two daughters of the Prophet (ﷺ) Ruqayyah and after her death Umm Kulthūm. 

ʿUthmān was among those who migrated twice for the sake of God, once to Abyssinia to escape persecution by the Meccans, and secondly to Madīnah. He was one of the most generous men. He once equipped an army heading out to Tabūk with 950 camels, 50 horses and then placed a thousand gold dinars  (roughly around $180,000) in the Prophet’s (ﷺ) lap. He freed countless slaves, saying that “No Friday has passed in which I did not free a slave since I accepted Islam, unless prevented in doing so by debt, then I would free him after that.” 

ʿUthmān was exceedingly handsome, as a result he would receive proposals before and after his conversion. Nevertheless, he was the most modest man, even the Prophet (ﷺ) attested to ʿUthmān’s modesty, famously citing that the angels’ felt meek before him. 

His Caliphate saw Islam spread further; Eastern Europe and much of North Africa were now under Muslim control. The first Muslim naval fleet was built under his tutelage, and diplomatic relations were being built as far as China with the Tang Dynasty. Although it is fair to say that his reign was not as popular as his predecessors, but this was due to the expansion being slow, resulting in economic stagnation. Nevertheless, he was still highly respected and thoughts of any kind of mutiny were far fetched.

His most famous achievement is the compilation of the Qurʾān. The Qurʾān was revealed in different dialects, in total seven, these are known as qira’as. As more non-Arabs became Muslim a problem arose over pronunciation of words, this led to confusion among new non-Arab Muslims. So ʿUthmān commissioned a group of companions to organise the Qurʾān according to the dialect of the Prophet’s (ﷺ) tribe, known as Qur’aysh. This would then be spread across the lands. 

He was also martyred, it’s reported that one night ʿUthmān saw a dream in which the Prophet (ﷺ) said, “Break your fast with us tomorrow.” ʿUthmān fasted the following day and was murdered by assailants who broke into his house before sunrise, at the time he was reading the Qurʾān; it was the last day of Dhū al-Ḥijjah. His death marked a turning point, Islam would never be the same again. He is buried in Baqī’ in Madīnah which lies adjacent to Masjid al-Nabawī.

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light.

Further Sources:

ʿUthmān b. `Affān - Dr T J Winter

ʿUthmān b. `Affān. (2014). In Encyclopaedia Britannica

Qurʾān Weekly: ʿUthmān b. `Affān

#10Companions: `Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb (d. 23/644)  
At first `Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb was a staunch enemy of Islam, but he embraced Islam after a duʿāʾ by the Prophet (ﷺ). He is the second of the #10Companions promised Paradise and and the second of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn. He was referred to as al-Fārūq (the discerner between truth and falsehood) after he accepted Islam at the hands of the Prophet (ﷺ), the companions enjoyed a great deal of success. He was also the first to be called Amīr al-Mu’minīn (Prince of the Believers).
He was a skilled fighter and horseman, this is why he is often portrayed as hard and harsh, but he loved the Prophet (ﷺ) dearly, he was so taken aback by the Prophet (ﷺ) passing that he threatened to kill anyone who claimed it was true. He was also a deeply compassionate man, it is said that he would roam and patrol the streets of Madīnah at night to personally feed and clothe the poor. 
His fairness was a hallmark of his rule as Caliph, it is reported that he kept two lamps. One was paid for by the state for all official work, the other was paid for from his personal allowance for personal use. Islam spread through the lands reaching part of Africa and Persia under his rule. He signed a revolution agreement commonly known as the Pact of Umar, between himself and Patriarch Sophronius, the treaty granted religious freedom to Christians and Jews in Jerusalem, in stark contrast with the previous conquerors that had ordered massacres. 
He was a man of deep spiritual insight too, once whilst delivering a sermon he shouted “Sāriyah, the mountain!” three times. Sāriyah was the commander of an army all the way in Nahawand. Later, a messenger informed `Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb that Sāriyah had heard his shout and understood the message, and that they achieved victory after changing their position in relation to the mountain. 
About him the Prophet (ﷺ) said,  
“In the nations long before you were people who were spoken to by angels, although they were not Prophets. If there is any one of them in my community, truly it is `Umar b. al-Khaṭṭāb.”
He died as a martyr from a knife wound at the age of 66, he is buried in Masjid al-Nabwī adjacent to Abū Bakr. 
May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light. 

Further Sources: 
`Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb - Dr T J Winter
Omar Series by MBC
Example of `Umar

#10Companions: `Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb (d. 23/644)  

At first `Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb was a staunch enemy of Islam, but he embraced Islam after a duʿāʾ by the Prophet (). He is the second of the #10Companions promised Paradise and and the second of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn. He was referred to as al-Fārūq (the discerner between truth and falsehood) after he accepted Islam at the hands of the Prophet (), the companions enjoyed a great deal of success. He was also the first to be called Amīr al-Mu’minīn (Prince of the Believers).

He was a skilled fighter and horseman, this is why he is often portrayed as hard and harsh, but he loved the Prophet () dearly, he was so taken aback by the Prophet () passing that he threatened to kill anyone who claimed it was true. He was also a deeply compassionate man, it is said that he would roam and patrol the streets of Madīnah at night to personally feed and clothe the poor. 

His fairness was a hallmark of his rule as Caliph, it is reported that he kept two lamps. One was paid for by the state for all official work, the other was paid for from his personal allowance for personal use. Islam spread through the lands reaching part of Africa and Persia under his rule. He signed a revolution agreement commonly known as the Pact of Umar, between himself and Patriarch Sophronius, the treaty granted religious freedom to Christians and Jews in Jerusalem, in stark contrast with the previous conquerors that had ordered massacres. 

He was a man of deep spiritual insight too, once whilst delivering a sermon he shouted “Sāriyah, the mountain!” three times. Sāriyah was the commander of an army all the way in Nahawand. Later, a messenger informed `Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb that Sāriyah had heard his shout and understood the message, and that they achieved victory after changing their position in relation to the mountain. 

About him the Prophet () said,  

“In the nations long before you were people who were spoken to by angels, although they were not Prophets. If there is any one of them in my community, truly it is `Umar b. al-Khaṭṭāb.”

He died as a martyr from a knife wound at the age of 66, he is buried in Masjid al-Nabwī adjacent to Abū Bakr. 

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light. 

Further Sources: 

`Umar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb - Dr T J Winter

Omar Series by MBC

Example of `Umar

#10Companions: Abū Bakr (d.13/634)
Abū Bakr was the first adult male who accepted the call of Islam, he is the first of the #10Companions to be promised Paradise and the first of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn. Due to his unwavering support and belief in the Prophet (ﷺ), he was given the title of al-Ṣiddīq (the Veracious)
He was the Prophet (ﷺ) closest companion and when the Divine Command came to emigrate from Makkah to Madīnah, the two travelled together. On their journey they took shelter in a cave, the Qurʾān mentions this incident  ”…and he said to his companion, ‘Do not grieve; indeed Allah is with us.”’ [9:40]
Abū Bakr was completely devoted to the Prophet (ﷺ), in fact when the Prophet (ﷺ) returned from the Night Journey, Abū Bakr was the first to believe the rather implausible journey. When asked by Quraysh chiefs about the ascension Abū Bakr said. “If he (ﷺ) said it, then it must be true.” 
His Caliphate was short but meaningful, Islam spread to Syria and Iraq, he battled Bedouin tribes that refused to pay zakat, he shot down several revolts most famously the false prophet Musaylamah ‘the Liar’. He was also one of the first to compile the Qurʾān into one complete text bound two covers called a muṣḥaf, prior to this it had been written on leaves, stones etc.
About him, the Prophet (ﷺ) said, 
“If the faith of the entire Muslim community were put on one side of a scale, and the faith of Abū Bakr on the other side, the faith of Abū Bakr would outweigh it.”
He is buried next to the Prophet (ﷺ) in Masjid al-Nabwī
May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light. 
Further Sources:
Abū Bakr - Dr T J Winter
Abū Bakr - Shaykh Omar Suleiman 

#10Companions: Abū Bakr (d.13/634)

Abū Bakr was the first adult male who accepted the call of Islam, he is the first of the #10Companions to be promised Paradise and the first of the Khulafā’ al-Rāshidūn. Due to his unwavering support and belief in the Prophet (ﷺ), he was given the title of al-Ṣiddīq (the Veracious)

He was the Prophet (ﷺ) closest companion and when the Divine Command came to emigrate from Makkah to Madīnah, the two travelled together. On their journey they took shelter in a cave, the Qurʾān mentions this incident  ”…and he said to his companion, ‘Do not grieve; indeed Allah is with us.”’ [9:40]

Abū Bakr was completely devoted to the Prophet (ﷺ), in fact when the Prophet (ﷺ) returned from the Night Journey, Abū Bakr was the first to believe the rather implausible journey. When asked by Quraysh chiefs about the ascension Abū Bakr said. “If he (ﷺ) said it, then it must be true.” 

His Caliphate was short but meaningful, Islam spread to Syria and Iraq, he battled Bedouin tribes that refused to pay zakat, he shot down several revolts most famously the false prophet Musaylamah ‘the Liar’. He was also one of the first to compile the Qurʾān into one complete text bound two covers called a muṣḥaf, prior to this it had been written on leaves, stones etc.

About him, the Prophet (ﷺ) said, 

“If the faith of the entire Muslim community were put on one side of a scale, and the faith of Abū Bakr on the other side, the faith of Abū Bakr would outweigh it.”

He is buried next to the Prophet (ﷺ) in Masjid al-Nabwī

May God be pleased with him, and fill his grave with light. 

Further Sources:

Abū Bakr - Dr T J Winter

Abū Bakr - Shaykh Omar Suleiman 

The twelve months of the year are like the twelve sons of Prophet Yaʿqub. And just as Prophet Yusuf was the most beloved to Yaʿqub, the month of Ramadan is the most beloved to Allah. And just as Allah forgave the 11 brothers by the duʿaʾ of one; Yusuf, He can forgive your 11 months of sins by your duʿaʾ in Ramadan.
Imām Ibn Jawzī